Create Your Own Snapchat Geofilter

Whether you’re hosting a conference, a festival, or a party, a Snapchat Geofilter is a great way to give your event the attention it deserves while making it extra fun for attendees. Learn how to create your own Snapchat Geofilter and take your event to the next level.

How Snapchat Geofilters Work

Image via Flickr by AdamPrzezdziek

If you’re a regular on Snapchat, you know that filters add fun design features and plenty of personality to your snaps. Think of Geofilters as next-level filters, since their cool graphic elements are only available during specific timeframes and in certain geographic areas.

While Snapchat Geofilters give event attendees with myriad opportunities for fun, they also give event planners a chance to boost visibility. Not only will promoting your festival or conference on Snapchat help get the word out, but using a Geofilter can also attract more attendees during the event itself.

Choose Your Geofilter Type

Snapchat Geofilters might look complex, but they’re relatively easy to set up and manage. Start by selecting from the two available Geofilter types, personal and business. Keep in mind that the Geofilter type doesn’t affect the cost, but it does limit what you can include in your design.

Personal Geofilters are ideal for events that you’re hosting for your friends and family, such as a birthday party, a holiday gathering, or a graduation get-together. You can include a variety of design elements in these Geofilters, but you can’t include logos, brands, or business names.

In contrast, Business Geofilters must include your company name, and they can also feature your logo or trademark. Be sure that you have permission to use any official brand graphics before moving forward with your design.

Understand the Requirements

Snapchat Geofilters offer plenty of design flexibility, but all must adhere to a set of specifications. To design your own Snapchat filter, keep in mind that you can’t include hashtags, URLs, Snapcodes, phone numbers, or emails. You should also leave off social media usernames and any social platform logos. Your Geofilter can include up to two lines of non-stylized text, but it can’t feature photographs of people.

In addition, Geofilters should leave part of the screen blank, and they should be relevant to the event or location. Planning to create a Geofilter for your political event or issue? Make sure the design specifies who purchased or sponsored the Geofilter.

Create Your Design to Spec

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When you’re ready to create your design, start with a file that measures 1080 pixels wide by 1920 pixels high. Add text or graphics, but use just the lower quarter of the screen to leave users ample space for their own pictures. After creating the design, be sure to give the Geofilter a transparent background. Save it as a .PNG file and make sure that it’s no larger than 300 KB.

Not sure how well your design will work as a Geofilter? Test it out on a few different photos to see how it looks. Use a handful of photos with varying compositions and light levels to make sure it will look great with all of your attendees’ photos.

If you don’t meet Snapchat’s specifications the first time around, rest assured that you can resubmit your design once you’ve made the required changes. If you’re creating your first Geofilter, give yourself a few days or even weeks of lead time to make sure you receive approval before the event starts.

Use a Geofilter Template

While you can certainly create a Snapchat Geofilter from scratch, using a template is much easier, especially if you’ve never designed one before. Find one that fits your theme, whether it’s a birthday party, wedding, conference, or trade show, and customize it to meet your personal or brand style. No matter what kind of look you’re going for, make sure that your Geofilter grabs users’ attention and that it’s something they’ll want to share with followers.

Submit Your Geofilter

Once you’ve put the finishing touches on your design, it’s time to submit it via Snapchat’s On Demand page. Log in with your personal or brand Snapchat account, upload your design, and take a look at the preview to see how your Geofilter will look when it goes live. If you’re creating a Geofilter for your company or brand, be sure to give it a name that’s easy to track after the event.

Set the Parameters

After uploading the design, select the date and time that your Snapchat Geofilter will be live. You can select time frames from a few hours up to 30 days.

Next, set the location for your Geofilter, which can range from 20,000 to 5 million square feet. While you should certainly include the exact location of your event within the geofence, you might also consider extending it an extra few thousand square feet. If you want to promote your event or draw in people in the neighborhood, creating a larger geofence puts your Geofilter on more Snapchat users’ radar. Ultimately, the size of the geofence and the length of the event determine the price of the Geofilter.

Measure Your Snapchat Success

Whether you’re creating a Geofilter for business or personal reasons, you undoubtedly want to know how well it performed. You can’t accurately track usage while the Geofilter is live, but you can evaluate your success after the filter expires.

To view your Snapchat Geofilter metrics, log into Snapchat, look at your orders, and then click on the appropriate filter. Take a look at both the number of views and the number of uses as you weigh your return on investment (ROI).

Want to give your Geofilter even more mileage? Consider posting your brand’s own Geofiltered snaps on your other social profiles. If your design is compelling enough, your event attendees just might feel compelled to do the same.

From corporate conferences to fun-filled parties, Snapchat Geofilters offer the perfect tool for putting your event in the spotlight. Keep this guide handy so you can make your next event a social media star.

About the author

Anna Sonnenberg

Anna Sonnenberg is an experienced writer and editor who focuses on digital marketing, travel, and natural products — but rarely all at once. With a background in research and the arts, Anna has a solid sense of the art of storytelling, along with a drive to gather the supporting data.