Creative Spotlight: How to Build Authority as an Online Writer

Building authority as an online writer isn’t as simple as writing the piece, hitting the publish button, and waiting for readers to arrive. While it takes some work to build, online authority is very important. As a writer with strong authority in your chosen niche, you gain the trust of partners and customers, which generally leads to more sales. You’re also more active in your field, which can open the door to more business opportunities. If you’re looking to build your authority as an online writer, there are many ways you can do so.

Become a Guest Blogger

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Chances are there are other blogs out there that deal with content similar to what you write about. Your first step is to seek these blogs out so you can reach the type of audience you want. One simple way to find these blogs is to do a Google search for keywords such as:

  • become a contributor
  • guest blogger guidelines
  • write for us
  • contribute an article

By adding keywords that correspond with your niche, you can narrow down your search to websites with content you write about.

One obvious benefit of guest blogging is that it opens you up to an entirely new audience. This can lead to increased website traffic, and greater opportunities for additional writing jobs. When you guest blog, you also have the opportunity to share an inbound link that comes back to your website. Link building is an important process because it plays a big role in search engine ranking.

Accept Guest Posts

Just like you want to find websites where you can share your content, opening up your own blog or website to guest posts will help you build authority. Accepting guest posts has many of the same advantages as guest posting on other blogs. When you allow other writers on your blog, you welcome in a new audience, expand your reach, and align yourself with other influential people in your niche. Plus, if readers find your website because of the guest post you accepted, they’re likely to view your own website as credible.

Write Evergreen Content

Evergreen content is content that stays fresh for its readers and doesn’t expire. When you’re trying to decide if your content is evergreen, consider if it will be relevant six months or a year after it’s been published. With this guideline in mind, topics on elections, fashion, statistics, and articles about holidays are not considered evergreen. On the other hand, instructional tutorials, top ten lists, and product reviews are evergreen.

When you’re writing evergreen content, keep in mind that narrow topics work better than broad topics. If you’re writing a large and broad topic, your piece could get too long, and your readers will lose interest. Therefore, while you might be interested in writing a topic about “How to Bake a Pie” focusing on “How to Make a Perfectly Flaky Pie Crust” could suit you better.

Also, keep in mind that while evergreen content is important, you shouldn’t be afraid to write about timely topics. While a topic about the best tips for decorating with Christmas lights won’t get a lot of readers in the middle of August, it will become popular every year around December.

Write Case Studies

A case study involves solving a problem by testing different methods until you find one that works the best. While case studies require a lot more work than your typical blog post, they also carry more weight with your audience because of the research and data that goes into them.

Luckily, finding a topic to write a case study about isn’t that difficult. Many writers choose to do one about a problem they frequently encounter. They simply want to find an easier way to complete a task, and they perform tests as they go until they find one. Once they’re done, they write a case study about their experience.

Even if you can’t come up with a topic for a case study this way, there are other ways to find one. You can also head to forums that are relevant in your niche and browse through the different topics there. Write down the questions you see multiple times on each forum. Now you have an even stronger topic for a case study because you have something you know people are talking about and searching for answers.

Use Social Media Accounts

While you might be active on your personal social media accounts, you should also create accounts specifically as an online writer. You can choose one or two popular networks, or decide to go with all of them. There are many ways you can use social media accounts to build authority. First, social media makes it very easy for people to learn about new content you’ve posted. Additionally, your readers can use links you’ve shared on your social media accounts to spread content they particularly enjoy. Finally, you can use social media to engage in thoughtful and important discussions with your audience.

Host Other Online Events

Beyond writing, there are other online events you can host that will help you build an audience and gain authority. Search for Internet radio shows in your niche and apply for a guest spot. There are thousands of shows that range from parenting, to business, to travel, and guest spots can last anywhere from 15 minutes to a full hour. If you can’t find a radio show that interests you, it’s also incredibly easy to start your own.

Another popular online event is the teleseminar. With a phone and a conference line, you can host a teleseminar on a topic by yourself, invite guests to give an interview, or lead a discussion with multiple guests about a topic. Not only is a teleseminar a good way to grow your authority, it’s also ideal for building an audience and increasing your email list.

If you’re looking to grow your writing business, building your authority as an online writer is the best way to do so. By implementing the above tips, you can become prominent in your own niche and gain more opportunities.

About the author

Kristen McCalla

Kristen enjoys writing, blogging, traveling, and reading. She has received CopyPress certifications as a CopyPress writer, copywriting, and Travel writer.