How to Incorporate LinkedIn Into Your Content Marketing Strategy

Everyone in the marketing universe seems to have a LinkedIn account, but few people actually use it well. Most people simply upload their resumes, and most brands just create a company description and leave the rest blank. LinkedIn has so much more to offer on a professional and company-wide level! Take these steps to add a boost to your LinkedIn content strategy.

Start With a LinkedIn Content Refresh

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Image via Flickr by Antigo Coletivo Mambembe

When was the last time your updated your company’s LinkedIn page? Has it been updated since you launched the page initially? At the very least, you should update your company page annually to match your website copy and to include new products or services.

Instead of writing evergreen copy for your company page, consider talking about where your business is going. Are you expanding? Are you testing a new market? If you’re planning a product launch in fall and have already teased out the concepts to the media, then brag about it in this space. This lets job seekers know that they’re stepping into an exciting chapter in the company’s history and can immediately make a difference when they start.

Get Your Employees Involved in Sharing Content

Make sure your team knows that the company is becoming more involved on LinkedIn, so they can offer their support through likes and shares. Encourage them to share helpful articles with you or comment and engage with the content that your team shares. Employee engagement gets really exciting when job seekers ask questions about your company. The best way for a potential graphic designer to get questions answered is when your design manager jumps in to clear things up.

Remember that your employees are a reflection of your company. Schedule a lunch meeting in the conference room to review tips and best practices for LinkedIn profiles. This gives your team an opportunity to spruce up their pages and makes them ready to become star networkers.

Share More Than Your Blog Content and Job Postings

People aren’t attracted to brands that only talk about themselves. A cardinal sin on Twitter is never sharing content that’s not your own, and the same applies to LinkedIn. Your audience will hide or unfollow you if you only share your blog posts and job postings, instead of creating a hub for industry information.

Most experts recommend following the rule of thirds for shared content. Devote one-third of your content to corporate information, one-third to thought-leadership pieces and insights, and one-third to interpersonal interactions. Try to promote your own content on a 2:1 ratio with others’ content. This can extend to 5:1 if you’re a large company that shares multiple job openings throughout the day in an effort to fill several entry-level positions.

LinkedIn Users Like Visuals, Too

In the same way that Twitter and Facebook users overwhelmingly like visuals, pictures and videos do well on LinkedIn too. In fact, updates with a photograph get five times more shares than simple text updates. The simple act of including a featured image in your blog content puts you well on your way to improving your LinkedIn performance.

Sharing photos and video also lets users skim through your content. They will stop long enough to read and like the photo and then move on.

So what kind of visual content should you share? Consider posting an animated GIF of a new software demo if you’re a SaaS company, or internal photos of the creation process if you offer products. Use this social media channel to create a behind-the-scenes look at your business.

Don’t Just Share —Publish!

LinkedIn is so much more than a social media platform — it’s also a great place to publish unique content by industry leaders. This might take some legwork, but ask your CEO, VP, founder, or whoever is in charge to update their LinkedIn profiles and start publishing unique content.

Your customers and clients want to know that whoever is at the helm knows what they’re doing. This is especially true for younger businesses and small B2B companies. LinkedIn is a wonderful space for discussing industry news, offering advice to up-and-comers, and announcing company updates. Let your clients and investors hear it from the horse’s mouth instead of from an admin-shared blog article.

Connect, Connect, Connect

At the end of the day, LinkedIn behaves like all other social networks: if you don’t bother building a community and forming relationships with the people around you, no one will care.

  • If you share a status, keep checking back for comments and keep the discussion going.
  • Start conversations through hashtags and in groups that engage members and make people listen.
  • Respond to questions and concerns about your company professionally and in a timely manner.

Whenever you share content from others in your industry, remember to tag the company and (if possible) the person who wrote it. This small sign of appreciation lets them know you’re engaged in what they post and want their writers to shine. After all, what’s the point in sharing the work of others if they don’t get a shout out?

Create Opportunities to Connect Off the Web

It’s almost a joke that people connect on LinkedIn when they’ve only met each other once, or never even met each other before. Companies are just as guilty of acquiring a following of connections and ignoring all of them.

Instead, use LinkedIn to create professional opportunities to meet off the web. Set up networking events just for your LinkedIn fans and let them step away from their screens and really get to know your team. These events don’t have to be fancy — pick a coffee shop or bar and keep it casual. They just have to create personal impressions.

There are so few companies that are engaging on LinkedIn that all it takes is a little elbow grease to stand out. Take a few baby steps (share an article, like a comment) and work your way up to the big guys, and you might start to see your business grow, too.

About the author

Amanda Dodge