The Alpha & Omega of Native Advertising

Stefan1

Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them.” - Albert Einstein

An inextricable link exists between the idea, attention, and conversion. While many continue to proclaim “Content is King,” Bill Gate’s prophetic statement has lost meaning. Entitled marketers flood every feed and channel with trite, impotent content.

The mere existence of content no longer commands attention. The new alpha is the Idea –properly ideated content—focused on both the content medium and the audience. The validation of the idea is the conversion/engagement—the omega.

While “entitled” content marketers are mired in past strategies, transient content mediums and six-second attention spans render them ineffective. The future belongs to the perceptive, flexible, and tenacious strategist—the marketer willing to evolve with the shifting market.

The Audience Wants the Control

Give people what they want, when they want it, in the form they want it…” - Kevin Spacey

Kevin Spacey’s speech on the future of television foretells the future of content marketing. Audience rejection of traditional TV/cinema parallels audience rejection of traditional, online  advertising. Connection and loyalty lies not with the format (e.g. Google, Facebook, etc.), but with the idea inspiring the content.

Native advertising is the future of content marketing because it is not married to a specific format (i.e. publisher, platform, medium). It “gives people what they want” by focusing on the people’s wants. It gives it to the people “when they want it” by appearing within the people’s preferred medium. It gives it to the people “in the form they want” by adapting the people’s preferred format. In short, it is as flexible as the shifting market.

This series will present an action plan to those acknowledging their battleship has been sunk. We will explore the alpha and omega of native advertising—who is successfully engaging; what can we learn from their successes. Stay tune for a look at the common failures that demonstrate the need for change.

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